New research report added: Managing cabbage aphid in Brussels sprouts

img_3297

Brussels sprouts infested with cabbage aphid

by Becky Sideman, UNH Cooperative Extension

From 2013 to 2015, we performed experiments comparing different varieties of Brussels sprouts as well as different topping practices. In these experiments, we observed severe infestations of cabbage aphid. Although our research did not focus on the aphids, they were quite a nuisance and rendered most sprouts unmarketable. From conversations with growers in the region, we came to realize that many growers, especially organic growers, were struggling with cabbage aphid management.

As part of her senior thesis, undergraduate student Talia Levy conducted a study to compare two different methods of managing cabbage aphids: intercropping with beneficial flowers and using a rotation between two organic insecticides. The short story is that, while we observed lots of aphid predators and parasites on the flowering plants, they did not provide sufficient control of cabbage aphids. On the other hand, weekly scouting and application of organic pesticides when economic thresholds were reached DID provide good control of cabbage aphid.

img_3146

Talia Levy, scouting for aphids

Want to learn more, and get the full scoop? The entire report is available here.

img_3291

This closeup of a Brussels sprout leaf shows several things: aphids at all stages including winged adults with black bodies and non-winged adults with their waxy gray appearance, and many parasitized aphids (these look like golden shells).

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Integrated pest management, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to New research report added: Managing cabbage aphid in Brussels sprouts

  1. Sherry Young says:

    Aphids. Ugh. I’m going to pass this off to my lovely young vegetable man next time I go to the local markets. Sherry Young (now in County Waterford, missing my UNHCE colleagues)

    On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:29 AM, NH Vegetable & Fruit News wrote:

    > beckysideman posted: ” From 2013 to 2015, we performed experiments > comparing different varieties of Brussels sprouts as well as different > topping practices. In these experiments, we observed severe infestations of > cabbage aphid. Although our research did not focus on the aphi” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s